Waiting for Toned Paper

Posted August 14, 2017 by JJ ColourArt
Categories: Artwork, Uncategorized

Tags: , ,

I ordered and received some toned tan paper that I bought from Amazon in the States because no one in Canada seems to have it yet. When I received the paper it felt wonderful but had a peculiar chemical smell. The spouse thought it smelled like perfume, I thought it might be detergent, although the pad doesn’t look like it got wet or warped. The corners were bashed in toward the front.

I contacted the manufacturer and sent them two pages so they could see about this smell. They will send me another pad but I hope this isn’t going to be the norm for this paper as I’d like to use it. I hope it’s not some kind of binding resin or glue on the cover as I was quite nauseated by the smell.

I’ve been looking at tutorials about drawing on toned paper, or using watercolour, pen and ink, and coloured pencil on toned paper and the techniques are a bit different. To date, I have used lighter weights of toned paper and also Canson Mi-Teintes but never heavier ones that took watercolour and other mixed media.

I downloaded some photographs of birds with a Creative Commons licence, and printed them on glossy photo paper to use as drawing references for some drawings with coloured pencil and watercolour that I’d like to do up and have framed. I’m inching toward that with practice and references.

While waiting for my toned paper I ordered two books:

ArtBooks_August

 1) Portrait Revolution: Inspiration from Around the World For Creating Art in Multiple Mediums and Styles by Julia L. Kay.

Inspired by the success of printing using my inkjet on glossy photo paper, I decided that I could take photographs of my husband and eventually print them as drawing references and practice doing portraits. I can also take photos of the pets and print them.

2) How to draw with colored pencils on toned paper in realistic style by Jasmina Susak.

I understand how to draw, but I’m not used to using just dark and light tones, particularly white on toned paper. This was an inexpensive reference and has some tutorials to practice which looked good.

It’s never too early to think about what art projects to complete during the winter months.

 

 

Hand Painted Tree Mural

Posted July 23, 2017 by JJ ColourArt
Categories: Artwork, Creativity, Uncategorized

Tags: , , , , , ,

I suppose this is more of a silhouette than a full mural, and it is inspired by the tree decals you can buy for walls. Apart from the exorbitant cost of a decal, this was an odd space by the front door in my foyer, so I knew I’d have to draw my own tree to fit the space.

TreeDrawing_chalk

I drew up a tree on paper, and then took measurements of my wall and the elements like the light fixture that I had to fit the tree around, and modified it slightly. I bought some children’s sidewalk chalk that came with a plastic holder at the dollar store, and used that to sketch the drawing onto the wall, eyeballing the proportions from the paper. Chalk is good because you can rub it off with a cloth if you make a mistake, and redo part of your drawing.

ChalkTree_sm

As I suspected, I had to decrease the width of my drawing once I got started transferring it to the wall. The story is that the tree got blasted by lightning on the left, but carried on growing to beckon people onward through the front door.

I have problems with tendinitis and arthritis, bad knees, and the challenge here was not to hurt myself but to get the artwork done. I first planned this 15 months ago but I needed to wait until the spouse repainted the foyer a pale grey first.

The tree took a day to draw up on paper and adjust, a second day to chalk it on the wall, and two days to put the first coat on. After that I was sore and could only do 40 minutes per day maximum so it took another six days to finish the second coat and do a few touch-ups.

TreeMuralFoyer_JJ

When you are sitting in the living room seeing this, the tree seems to include the whole room, so instead of having this empty-looking foyer with its light and table, it becomes part of the whole room, not just a little area isolated by the front door.

The big “J” was a solid wood one we bought 38 years ago, and I often feature that letter in artwork or crafts; I wasn’t sure it would fit in the tree, but it seems to like it.

What letter wouldn’t like to hang around in a tree?

 

 

 

Books on Painting Water and Bird Photography

Posted July 21, 2017 by JJ ColourArt
Categories: Artwork, Books

Tags: , , , , , , ,

I want to do up a small watercolour and coloured pencil drawing of a sandpiper to represent a story from my father’s childhood. Now that he’s dead I’d like to get this done and framed. I was going to use Stonehenge paper because I want to do it on a toned surface with minimal background. Strathmore has a new toned mixed media paper that is heavyweight and can take watercolour better but it doesn’t seem to be in Canada yet, so I might wait a bit to see if it shows up in art supply stores in a few weeks, hopefully it won’t take months and months which is the usual way of distributing supplies here.

So for preliminaries I was looking for good photo references. There are several types of sandpipers here and sanderlings as well. Not knowing the particular species, I found a photo of a Western Sandpiper and a Sanderling in books by Glenn Bartley: Birds of British Columbia: A Photographic Journey, published in 2013, and Birds of Vancouver Island: A Photographic Journey, published in 2010 that will be useful.

BCBirdBooks

I like photographic bird books because you can so easily see the exact birds that might be around you. Even my field guide for birds can be confusing, so I loved these two books and see all kinds of references that might be useful for drawing some of my favourite birds.

The other two books I bought are (surprise!) watercolour and pen and ink books on techniques for drawing and painting water and weather, coastal scenes, rivers, rainy streets, rocks, spray, glittering light on water, all kinds of scenarios.

WaterBooks

The first is by Claudia Nice, Down by the Sea with Brush & Pen: Draw and Paint Beautiful Coastal Scenes. I have about five of Claudia’s books and they are excellent, and she uses different media. She really covers everything in this, from rough seas to coastal trees, even dogs and children playing at the beach.

The second is by Ron Hazell called The Artist’s Guide to Painting Water in Watercolor: 30 Techniques, and he too has some comprehensive scenes and much information on the way light behaves on water and how to paint that, how to paint reflections.

I just need to wait for the right paper.

 

 

 

 

 

Beefing Up Gouache Palette and Brushes

Posted June 26, 2017 by JJ ColourArt
Categories: Artwork

Tags: , , , , , ,

One of the fairly local art supply places has a big sale on so I added four more colours to my gouache palette. While fiddling around doing decorative initials and drop caps on my Manner and Material blog, I realized that it was either too laborious to mix certain colours or mixing used too much white, so I bought these on sale. The Winsor Violet cost a lot but it will be so useful and I felt lost without Burnt Sienna. Opera Rose was an indulgence and the Olive Green is one I use quite a bit in regular watercolours so it made sense to buy a tube of gouache in that colour too.

WNGouache_new

While browsing Instagram and looking at people’s watercolours, I saw one woman mention the Escoda Versàtil brand of synthetic sable brushes as being great and holding up to lots of mixing. To date, I have only used relatively inexpensive brushes that don’t last very long, but these Escoda brushes were on sale so I bought a #4 and a #6 round. I use those most often and could only afford two so this was my decision. I will take good care of them!

EscodaVersatil_Rounds

 

 

 

Daniel Smith Watercolour Sets

Posted June 18, 2017 by JJ ColourArt
Categories: Artwork, Creativity

Tags: , ,

Daniel Smith has an enormous number of watercolours and some with special effects. Way too many for my budget, but I decided to make up a little palette of twelve colours from sets they offer.

DanielSmith_2Sets

The paints come in tubes, so I bought a tin box with 12 half pans that I can squeeze the watercolour into and thus have a nicely organized portable palette.

Medeen_12HalfTin

Is this something I needed? No, but I’m going to have fun trying them out. I also realized that I could drive myself nuts trying to pick the perfect Daniel Smith pigments to buy, and they are scarce in Canada, so I gave up and ordered the sets and tin off Amazon.ca.

I went through agonies of indecision when setting up my main 24-pan Winsor & Newton watercolour palette in a similar tin with purchased half pans. This Daniel Smith tin is just for fun, just to noodle around moving paint around and seeing what happens.

I think I’m going to find the natural pigment in the Primatek set interesting to work with and mix.

 

 

 

Organizing Quilting Fabric

Posted June 11, 2017 by JJ ColourArt
Categories: Quilting, Sewing

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When I moved to a new house I just took all my fabric out of boxes and piled it up neatly, with no regard to colour. I knew I’d have to sort it out once I got my new sewing machine, so that I could more easily find fabrics. After reading some of my new books on scrap quilts, and the recommendations for sorting by colour, I finally tackled this big job and am satisfied that I took the time to do it.

So I bought some wire baskets from the dollar store and laid out 12 of them on tables and commenced sorting my fabric. I folded the smaller pieces into the baskets, and then folded larger pieces and yardage in piles by each basket. The colour designations I used were:

Blue
Teal
Purple
Red
Green
White
Pink
Brown
Neutral Grey, Taupe, Beige
Multi Brights

This is a view of the Purple and Green piles.

OrganizedFabric2

Then I put them back in the flat pack cupboard I use for fabric. I sorted my batting scraps and placed them in a storage bin on top of the cupboard, and inside two bankers boxes I put big yardage for backings, and yardage of corduroy and velveteen that I use for sewing bags.

OrganizedFabric_sm

I also have my current projects laid out so that they aren’t buried and I can access them, which is much more practical.

The cupboard is not quite wide enough to have the baskets spaced evenly so it looks a bit jumbled, but it is so easy to find colours, especially the smaller pieces that are now collected in the baskets, and I discovered many fabrics that I’d forgotten I had so I am very pleased I took the time to sort in this way. It will be much easier to pick and choose fabrics for scrap quilts in the future.

 

New Botanical Drawing and Painting Books and Sketchbooks

Posted May 31, 2017 by JJ ColourArt
Categories: Books

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Botanical Drawing using Graphite and Coloured Pencils by Sue Vize which has a lovely mix of graphite and coloured pencil, one of my favourite approaches to botanicals.

The other one uses support boards for painting which is not something I’m interested in but he has some useful information on glazing and mixing with gouache. Botanical Painting with Gouache: a step-by-step guide by Simon Williams.

BotanicalBooks

I am still having trouble with my shoulder which makes it painful to draw but I am following a vegan eating plan and hoping that will promote healing. To dispel discouragement because I haven’t been able to work in my large Stillman & Birn Zeta sketchbook for the pretend trip to Chile, I ordered two smaller Stillman & Birn sketchbooks with the same heavier weight of paper for everyday sketching.

I got the wire bound 7 x 7-inch Beta paper which is slightly rougher than the Zeta paper but not as rough apparently as cold-press watercolour. Then I decided to try a softcover Zeta sketchbook in a smaller 8 x 10-inch size than the hardcover I have.

Sketchbooks_June2017

I really like these heavier weights of paper that Stillman & Birn offer. Curry’s in Canada has discontinued carrying these sketchbooks and local shops won’t carry them because of the price, but I mail ordered mine from Aboveground Art in Toronto, who have been very good to buy Faber-Castell supplies from, which I also find hard to hunt up.

Here’s to healing and feeling better!